Found in small communities, dotted around the Serengeti Plateau and Lake Eyasi in Tanzania, the Hadza people are a group of under 1000 people deemed to be the last real hunter-gathers on earth. Despite outside interference and attempts, over the last two centuries, to introduce agriculture and Christianity to the Hadza, the majority continue to live in a traditional way, without fixed abode, crops, calendars or many belongings, as they live the life our distant ancestors once lived, all the way into the 21st century.

About the Hadzabe

With an estimated population of less than 2,000 individuals, the Hadzabe are one of the last tribes to stay true to their tribal history. Existing far from the crowds and globalization that inevitably follow tourism, they exist much as they always have.

Men typically hunt and bring home honey to feed their families, while women and children gather fruits, berries, and roots with which to supplement their diet.

The men are particularly adept hunters, and their daring and inventive hunting style is a sight to behold. Using parts harvested from other animals, they cunningly lure and put down game. As this is their only source of food, they are the only tribe permitted to hunt in the Serengeti.

The Hadzabe people live in caves near Lake Eyasi, and their isolation and shrinking numbers have allowed them to avoid the HIV epidemic  and other diseases that have spread due to intertribal marriages.

An interesting facet of Hadzabe culture is their language. Believed to have some kind of relation to the Bushmen of the Kalahari Desert, the Hadzabe language is a distinctive tongue of clicks that is similar to that of the famous Bushmen. Despite this and their similar physical appearances, DNA testing has shown no relation between the two groups.

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